SC rejects self-financing medical students’ pleas for normal fees

By: News Desk
Published: 03:58 PM, 6 Sep, 2022
The Supreme Court (SC) on Tuesday rejected over 17 petitions filed by the self-financing medical students, seeking a court order for their colleges to charge them normal fees
Caption: File photo.
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The Supreme Court (SC) on Tuesday rejected over 17 petitions filed by the self-financing medical students, seeking a court order for their colleges to charge them normal fees, reported 24NewsHD TV channel.

A three-member bench of the SC, headed by Chief Justice of Pakistan (CJP) Justice Umar Ata Bandial, heard the petitions. 

Speaking on the occasion, counsel for the students said that the Punjab government had notified some time back that admissions on 76 seats, reserved for the self-financing students, would now be on open merit. “Now only foreign students will be able to get admissions on these seats,” he said, and added, “Even overseas Pakistanis will now be eligible for admissions on these seats.”

Therefore, he prayed to the court that his clients be charged the fees which were charged from the students getting admissions in medical colleges on open merit. 

Speaking on the occasion, Justice Mansoor Ali Shah remarked that the government had not abolished the self-finance scheme. 

Justice Qazi Faez Isa said there were some conditions for filing a petition in the court. “One can only approach the court when he or she is affected by the government’s measure,” he said, and added, “I don’t think there is any basis for filing this petition.” 

“Tell me what harm did the government’s notification did to you?” he questioned. 

Students’ lawyer replied that even he did not want the notification to be rescinded. “All I am asking for is that you order medical colleges to charge my clients the fees they charge from the students getting admissions on open merit,” he added. 

The CJP said that there was no merit list of these students. 

Speaking on the occasion, PMDC’s lawyer said sometimes even students securing 85 per cent marks did not get admissions on open merit. “On the contrary, there are instances in which self-financing students getting 35 per cent marks were given admissions in medical colleges,” he elaborated.

Reporter: Amanat Gishkori